Mr. Chairman,

Excellencies Ministers

Ladies and Gentlemen


Let me start by thanking to Dr. Supachai Panitchpakdi for inviting me to this Ministerial meeting and to the government and people of Qatar for hosting this important Conference.

Allow me also to commend the distinguished ministers for putting a great deal of time and energy into this Meeting- their meeting.  This attests to their continued and strong commitment and leadership towards the realization of the development aspirations expressed by the LDCs in the Istanbul Political Declaration and Programme of Action.


Mr. Chairman,

Excellencies Ministers

Ladies and Gentlemen

 

After the successful staging of the Istanbul Conference, the challenge ahead was to match the commitments contained in the Istanbul Programme of Action with actions. Cognizant of this, my Office convened a brainstorming meeting in June 2011 to discuss with other UN organisations, the Bretton Woods Institutions as well as OECD and some member states the way forward, including a Road Map for the implementation of the Istanbul Programme of Action.  The aim of the Road Map was to help achieve a coordinated, coherent and effective implementation of the IPoA. In this regard, it delineates roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders, namely the inter-governmental bodies, parliaments, CSOs, private sector and the UN System, and spells out a timeline for carrying out specific activities.  The content of the Road Map was discussed and agreed at the brainstorming meeting.

 

Mr. Chairman,

Excellencies Ministers

Ladies and Gentlemen


Allow me to report to you what has been achieved so far. I am pleased to report to you that we have embarked on a journey toward the implementation of the Istanbul Programme of Action.

IAEA, UNCDF, UNCTAD, UNDP, UN-ESCAP, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNICEF, UNIDO, UNFCCC, UNOPS, UN-WOMEN, WFP, WIPO and WMO have committed to integrating the provisions of the IPoA into their respective Programmes of work. This trend will continue as the governing bodies of other UN organizations are expected to follow suit in the months to come. The WTO is expected to reflect the trade-related elements of the IPoA into its work by revising the Work Programme of the Sub-Committee on LDCs. 

We have also been tapping into existing UN coordination mechanisms, including EC-ESA and CEB, to advance the implementation of the IPoA. To that intent, presentations were made at the Executive Committee on Economic and Social Affairs (EC-ESA) meeting and at the High-Level Committee on Programmes (HLCP) meeting. This presentation made before the HLCP was followed by an HLCP draft Statement of support to the implementation of Istanbul Programme of Action, which was tabled to the 2011 Chief Executives Board (CEB) Fall meeting.

Our efforts to promote global consensus building in support of the implementation of the IPoA and through intergovernmental processes are also ongoing. ECOSOC passed a resolution in support of the implementation of the IPoA. The same holds for the General Assembly which at its Sixty Six Session adopted a resolution supporting the implementation, after endorsing the outcomes of the Fourth United Nations Conference in June 2011.

Also consistent with the importance given in the Istanbul Programme of Action to non-governmental stakeholders such as parliaments, civil society and the private sector, efforts are under way to fully harness the contribution of these actors to the implementation of the IPoA. The International Parliamentarian Union (IPU) was requested by its members to mobilize support for the implementation of the IPoA. Civil society country consultations were held in a number of African, Asian and Pacific LDCs. More will be convened in the future to disseminate the content of the IPoA, trigger discussions on its priority areas and ultimately help incubate issues-based alliances to advocate for a greater mainstreaming and implementation of the IPoA.

Academia is also expected to contribute to implementation. A group of eight think tanks and academic institutions from LDCs and partner countries come up with a new initiative, called LDC IV Monitor, the aim of which is to conduct policy research in support of policy-making, organise dialogues and carry out outreach activities. This initiative will complement the official follow-up and review mechanism of the IPoA.

Turning to the private sector contribution, it is worth mentioning that Global Compact has already helped establish in 2011 and 2012 ten new Local Networks. The role of these Networks is to promote sustainable business development, create special forums for enterprises and other stakeholders to exchange on challenges and potential responses to these challenges, and to connect LDCs to the broader global economy and related supply chains. In addition, the Private Sector Steering Committee planned to institute a well-structured platform that will foster partnership among LDC and non-LDC private sectors on the implementation of the IPoA.

In addition, capacity- building activities are planned to leverage the contribution of LDC governments but also their parliaments, civil society and the private sector to the achievement of the Goals of the IPoA. A compendium of project documents highlighting these activities and their costs involved has been prepared.

The Road Map also envisaged the establishment of a number of working groups and task forces, such as that on the establishment of a Technology Bank and Science, Technology and Innovation supporting mechanism dedicated to LDCs. The aim of all these schemes is to recommend effective tools to be used to realize the development aspirations underscored in various priority areas for action of the IPoA. The working group on indicators has for instance proposed, reviewed and finalized a set of indicators for the monitoring, follow-up and review of the IPoA. This set of indicators is expected to inform national, regional and global monitoring, follow-up and review of the IPoA

We have also been advised of the efforts of LDCs to implement their fair share of commitments. A number of them have commenced to reflect some priority areas of action of the IPoA into their development plans and strategies and clearly reiterate the goal of achieving graduation –or becoming an emerging developing country– as an essential element of their long-term development visions. I would like to encourage other LDCs that have not done so to take full ownership in the implementation of the IPoA and scale up its mainstreaming in their national development plans and strategies.

As you could notice, we have made encouraging progress so far.  Yet the road ahead is long. Much distance needs to be travelled to secure the effective implementation of the Istanbul Programme of Action. I hope that your deliberations today will be yet another important step toward this.

 

Mr. Chairman,

Excellencies Ministers

Ladies and Gentlemen


I would like to close this statement by assuring you that OHRLLS will continue to work closely with UNCTAD-its main strategic partner-, and with other UN organizations as well as other stakeholders outside the UN system so as to advance LDC development agenda.

I thank you all for your kind attention and look forward to a lively and successful Ministerial meeting.